In an 11 page opinion (the “Opinion”) released March 9, 2015, in the Trump Entertainment Resorts, Inc. bankruptcy (Case No. 14-12103), Judge Gross interpreted Bankruptcy Code 503(b)(1)(A) in approving the reclassification of a claim from a priority claim to a general unsecured claim.  The Opinion is available here.  Administrative claims are an integral part of

There are generally three types of claims in a bankruptcy proceeding: unsecured claims, secured claims and administrative expense claims. Section 503 of the Bankruptcy Code governs the allowance of administrative expense claims. Section 503 provides that “after notice and a hearing, there shall be allowed administrative expenses…, including the actual and necessary costs and expenses

On May 8, 2012, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (the “Court”) entered its Order (the “Order”) Establishing Procedures to Assert Claims Arising under Section 503(b)(9) of the Bankruptcy Code (“503(b)(9) Claims”) in the chapter 11 cases of AFA Investment, Inc. and its affiliated debtors (collectively, the “Debtors”) (Bankr. D. Del. 12-11127

Introduction

On August 3, 2010, Judge Mary F. Walrath of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware issued an opinion in the Qimonda bankruptcy addressing whether Google was entitled to an administrative claim against the Qimonda bankruptcy estate.  This post will look briefly at the facts underlying Google’s claim, the holding of

Introduction

The Honorable Christopher S. Sontchi, presiding over the Goody’s bankruptcy in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware, issued a decision recently regarding the scope of administrative claims under 11 U.S.C. 503(b)(9).  Section 503(b)(9) provides that after notice and a hearing, there shall be an allowed administrative expense claim for

Introduction

In a decision that the Court deemed “one of first impression for this Circuit,” the Honorable Kevin Gross of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware, declined to grant administrative claim status to employee WARN Act claims, instead finding that the employees’ claims vested prior to the commencement of the bankruptcy