In a short opinion entered November 14, 2017 Judge Gross of the Delaware Bankruptcy Court denied a motion of an interested party to “Attend and Participate in the Rule 2004 Examinations to be Conducted by the Trustee”. Judge Gross’s opinion is available here (the “Opinion”).

This is a very short Opinion and resolves a very straight-forward issue.  Can a party in separate litigation take advantage of Bankruptcy Rule 2004 to obtain discovery from the opposing party?

The answer: No.

Citing multiple cases, Judge Gross explains that the “pending proceeding rule” provides that once an adversary proceeding or contested matter has been commenced, discovery must proceed under the federal discovery rules.  The cited opinions were: In re SunEdison, Inc., 572 B.R. 482 (Bankr. S.D.N.Y. 2017);  In re Wash. Mut., Inc., 408 B.R. 45 (Bankr. D. Del. 2009); In re Enron Corp., 281 B.R. 836 (Bankr. S.D.N.Y. 2002); 2435 Plainsfield Ave. v. Township of Scotch Plains (In re 2435 Plainsfield Ave.), 223 B.R. 440 (Bankr. D.N.J. 1998); In re Coffee Cupboard, Inc., 128 B.R. 509 (Bankr. E.D.N.Y. 1991).

As discussed in a previous post on this blog, 2004 discovery is most akin to fishing expeditions meant to determine whether or not litigation should be commenced.  You can read that post here: What are the Scope and Limitations of a Rule 2004 Examination?

John Bird practices with the law firm Fox Rothschild LLP and is resident in Portland, Oregon. You can reach John at 302-622-4263, or jbird@foxrothschild.com.